Supreme Court decision on Roe V. Wade reflects minority view

Thousands marched on the Capitol building in St. Paul this past Sunday to protest the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling to overturn Roe V Wade. The ruling removes federal protections for abortion access that have been in place for close to fifty years.



“They want to control our bodies, our health care, our identity - they want to control our families and our relationships,” said Summra Shariff, a board member with ACLU-MN. “But the truth of the matter is that all those decisions belong to us - they belong to us and not to the government.”

Two nationwide polls - by Gallup and the Pew Research Center - found that a majority of Americans support the right to an abortion. A recent informal survey of people on the street in downtown Minneapolis came up with similar results. BLCK Press agreed to quote them by first name only.


“I feel very sad,” said Bailey. “I was sick to my stomach for a few days, actually. I thought I had the flu but I figured out it was anxiety and all that.”


“I don't want an activist supreme court,” said Andy. “I want a supreme court that holds the law and only the law, and the way they’re looking at human rights now in my mind is pretty disgusting.”

Here in Minnesota, the right to an abortion is still protected - for now. In the wake of the Supreme Court’s ruling, Governor Walz signed an emergency executive order protecting the right to an abortion in Minnesota. That order, according to state statutes, will expire 90 days after Walz leaves office.


”I’m hoping for the best,” said Andy, “but I’m very nervous about the state legislature.”


All two-hundred-and-one seats in the Minnesota Legislature are up for election this November.


“Letting a woman decide what they do with their body is the right choice,” said a young man named Darius. “It's never okay to tell people ‘you don't get to decide.’”

Darius’ friend James said he worries that the Supreme Court will go after gay marriage and other civil rights next.


Abortions are now banned in nine states, with more bans expected in the coming weeks.